Harriet Kesia Hunt on Critics

Harriet Kesia Hunt (1805-1875) was a self-supporting spinster school teacher when she first became interested in medicine. Her younger sister suffered a debilitating aliment that was exacerbated by the treatment she received from the physicians.             Hunt studied homeopathic medicine under Elizabeth and Richard Mott who identified her sister’s illness as tuberculosis and cured her. In …

bell hooks on I wanted to write…

A passionate scholar, philosopher, and educator, bell hooks is the critically acclaimed author of books on racism, feminism, education, class, and culture. A listing of just some of her titles shows the breadth and depth of thought and concerns: Critical Thinking, Teaching to Transgress, Sisters of the Yam, Teaching Community: The Politics of Hope, Art …

Jane Addams on Democracy

Jane Addams  [1860-1935] is well-known for her work at Hull House helping the indigent. She is lesser known for her crusade for women's suffrage and world peace, and her philosophical writings. In 1931 she became the first American woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize. Addams had three ethical principles we would do well to hold today. Teach by …

Virginia Penny On Women’s Employment

 To write her book The Employments of Women: A Cyclopaedia of Women’s Work (1863) Viginia Penny interviewed hundreds of women across the country. In the book she listed five hundred possible occupations for women, railed against the artificial barriers that prevented women from entering certain fields of works, and critiqued the wage differential between men and women. When …

Lucretia Mott on Truth

The Quaker minister, Lucretia Mott, lived from 1793 to 1880. During that time she fought to reform society in every way she could. She believed that forming organized groups and taking action against social injustice was the way to bring about change. She founded the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society (1833), was the impetus behind the …